When a locksmith was left with this huge safe on his desk, he realised it wasn’t going to be easy to crack into.

It was impregnable from the outside, with a seriously thick metal door. However, this safe-cracker, who goes by the name of unkapier was savvy enough to manage to gain access to the safe’s interior.

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When he found out what the contents were, he was amazed.

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Luckily for us, when this locksmith was given the task of trying to open this monster of a safe, he documented it step-by-step. He shared the images online, stating “I’m a locksmith, got to open this safe today.” And what a cool safe it was, the make of it is ‘Mosler’ who are now out of business but used to manufacture boxes and bank vaults from 1874 through to the 21st century.

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It was a known fact that Mosler vaults were impenetrable, so he knew he was in for a tricky task. These vaults were even used throughout the Second World War, and were installed in the Mitsui Bank in Hiroshima, Japan, and even survived the bomb dropped on the city. We’re unsure as to whether anything these days would be able to withstand such force.

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After the war, the reputation of the brand earned them numerous new contracts with extremely high-profile companies. For example, they worked for the United States Government, manufacturing the doors for missile silos and for other security features. Mosler even built the vault used to display the U.S Constitution and Declaration of Independence.

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The logic behind the vault technology was a 138-ton blast door, which was considered the largest and heaviest door in the world. This door was installed at the Atomic Energy Commission’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, this door, the heaviest in the world, could in fact be opened by just one person.

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The safe this locksmith had been given to work on obviously wasn’t as heavy duty as those used by the government. However, the Mosler branding meant that he would still have his work cut out for him. He gathered up his tools and began the process of trying to gain entry to the door, setting to work on the brass combination dial.

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It seemed that the locksmith was able to open the door with minimal fuss, his years in the industry meant he was highly skilled in the tricky process of unpicking the mechanisms involved. There are many methods of opening a locked safe, one of which is weak-point drilling, and brute force. However, the ease in which he managed to get inside meant that he was probably able to work out the combination.

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This may not have been as difficult as it sounds, as many safe-owners choose not to change the combination which would have been set originally by the manufacturer. Of course, this makes the vault all the more vulnerable, as anyone could just look up the combination, all that would be needed is the model and serial number of the safe and manufacturer.

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Strangely enough, this locksmith decided to continue dismantling the safe even after he opened the door, including stripping away a red metal panel inside the door. He expose the lock mechanisms which were embedded inside the door, and unlike many modern safes, which often rely on electronics, everything inside this one looked very sturdy and reliable.

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There appeared to be several numbers etched into the inside of the cement coated door, and it is logical to assume that the number may refer to the combination. Obviously now that the locksmith had gained entry, he wouldn’t need the combination to the lock anymore.

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The lock mechanism appeared to consist of two heavy-duty sliding bars, which when clenched into place, meant that the box should have been completely impenetrable. So now the smith had got into the safe, it is time to find out what the safe contained, and to try and figure out when the last time someone opened it was.

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Unfortunately, the locksmith didn’t reveal any information online about the safe’s previous owner, and all details about who they might have been, why the owned the antique safe, and for how long, are all missing from his documentation of the opening of this vault. However, the box still contained a number of interesting and precious possessions.

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However, the locksmith was unable to get his hands on these valuables, as just beyond the main door was a second door, which was locked and completely inaccessible. It was also now clear to see that the volume of it’s contents was not as large as what had appeared from the outside, as the walls were actually several inches thick.

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However, as this locksmith is so experienced, and he managed to get it open in no time. Behind the second door, several drawers appeared, which would be a very good place to keep jewellery, documents and other precious keepsakes.

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Naturally, as a locksmith, the lock mechanism themselves are a precious treasure. Above, he has removed the brass lock from the inner door and photographed its workings for everyone to admire – if they are interested in that. Other than this lock though, the safe did actually contain other goods of some value.

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The inside of the safe looks like something from an old film, you would hope it would be full of amazing and valuable jewels – considering the age of the vault itself, there is a high possibility that this could have been sealed many, many years ago.

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The locksmith was in luck with his findings, discovered rolls of cold, hard cash. In total, the safe seemed to contain a few hundred dollars, which is better than nothing! As well as the notes, there was also a handful of loose change.

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There appeared to be more to the story than expected. Upon closer inspection, the notes themselves turned out to be rather intriguing. Among the bills, there were some extremely old two dollar bills, which are considered the rarest denomination in U.S currency. They are also a legal tender and constitute around one percent of all notes in circulation.

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However, despite all of this, the bills generally aren’t worth anything more than their face value. Over time, they still have a chance of appreciating and may one day become collectible. Until then however, it may be worth keeping the bills in a safe place, in a vault perhaps!

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Thanks to this savvy locksmith, we have been able to see the safe now opened, and its contents removed, giving us an up-close and personal glimpse of the inner workings of a ancient Mosler safe.

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